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WHY INFORMATION VISUALIZATION

"A picture is worth a thousand words" and... zillion numbers.
Recent studies indicate that the human mind can analyze complex data better with images and sounds than in text or numbers. Human factors research shows that effective data understanding depends upon the presentation of information in ways that are consistent with the mental model of the user.

Sound adds nine octaves to the cognitive capabilities.
There is evidence that the ear can perceive many simultaneous data dimensions. Studies have shown a major difference in cognification of sight versus sound: our ears can disambiguate composite sounds into their constituents. Sonic directionality is another powerful perceptual cue for both hunt and survival. Surround-sound (six or seven independent digital sound channels) thus provides great advantage to humans desiring to "sound out" data information.

The synchronous combination of visual and auditory analysis offers new opportunities to:

  • integrate and correlate multiple data, and
  • decompose information in their primitives.

    Plots and pies have limitations.
    Current methods for presenting information have limitations when dealing with large amounts of information, be they waveforms, pie charts, diagrams, icons, matrices, etc. Often decision making depends on sifting and integrating through screenfuls of data: as a result, traditional tools often produce information overload and confusion instead of insight and decision-making power. Most attempts at creating new graphic representations (e.g., 3-D computer graphics and visualization) are limited to simulating phenomena of spatial objects and do not address abstract and/or non-spatial data. IntuInfo offers a new 3D visualization system specifically designed to deal with vast streams of abstract information as it is produced and measured in the human body, industrial processes, business activities and natural phenomena.

    Information society? More visualization tools are needed.
    The trends of our information society point at ever more complex and enormous amounts of data. As the production and dependence on information grows, so does the need for tools to assist in the monitoring and analysis of that information locally or over the Internet.